healthcare and cholera

 

 

Photo by MDDHL Mokolo 8192

This is the body of a 2-year-old baby wrapped up.  The baby has been abandoned in the rain.  Its mother had caught cholera, and consequently, the baby too.  The child died at hospital at 8am and was left until 1:30pm when I intervened to see if we could bury it.  Even this dead baby must have his rights, the right to burial. It is a human being. It shouldn’t be rejected like this because of cholera.  The hospital also doesn’t have the capacity to face the cholera epidemic. There is a lack of infrastructure, personnel – a complete lacking.  Cholera is also an illness tied to poverty – someone came and took a shit and the virus started multiplying in the water.  We are left swimming in shit.  To prevent epidemics there needs to be good application of hygiene rules and toilets.  In Mokolo not even the Mayor’s toilet works!

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Photo by MDDHL Mokolo 8071

Here we see a banner where it is written “The Health District of Mokolo and its staff welcome his Excellency the Minister of Public Health”. We took this picture for two reasons.  The first is that at the hospital we can be taken care of.  That’s good, very good. But, on the other hand, we ask the question whether the minister arrives to save people suffering from cholera? There is a problem of health funding in Mokolo. Does the government only intervene in situations when people start to die? Is this when they get involved?  Cholera is caused by filthy conditions, connected with water. Our wish is that we don’t wait for cholera to be present before acting. This means that the sensitization campaigns we want to see should be ongoing. This is not a thing that just comes up randomly or where we have to wait till people die before the Minister descends. The State could provide some money to educate the population about health.

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Photo by MDDHL Mokolo 8192

This child is in agony due to cholera.  Its mother left him in filth.

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Photo by MDDHL Maroua 385

A street vendor of medications.  Ongoing consumption of medicines without a prescription can harm our health. Medicines sold on the street kill. This is a crime against humanity.  The Minister of Health and local administrative authorities are responsible for changing this.

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Photo by MDDHL Maroua 495

A community health clinic. The picture was taken to tell you that we found – on two occasions – expired medications.  There is significant work for MDDHL to make sure this doesn’t happen again.  The lives of our citizens are at stake.  The Regional or Departmental Delegate of Health and the head of this clinic are responsible for changing things.

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Photo by MDDHL Maroua 495

A traditional medicine clinic. Traditional practitioners do not have any training in the use of natural products and represent a danger to the population because the products they sell are not tested and don’t have a set or standard dosage.  We need to do awareness building about the dangers stalking the population.  The Delegate of Public Health, as a partner responsible for change, needs to intervene in this case.

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